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Minimum Wage on the Ballot in 2016

With the inequality gap continuing to rise, and Congress refusing to address the issue, citizens across the United States are stepping in to fill in the gaps.

This November, the minimum wage will appear on the ballot in five states.

Arizona:

In Arizona, the ballot initiative proposes to increase the state minimum wage to $12 by 2020. While there was initially a legal challenge, it will be on the ballot in November. According to the non-partisan Grand Canyon Institute, the ballot proposition would provide a raise to 790,000 Arizonans, two-thirds of whom are over the age of 24, and forty percent of whom are working single mothers.

Colorado:

Colorado is also attempting to raise their minimum wage via ballot initiative this year. Similar to Arizona’s initiative, it will raise the minimum wage in Colorado to $12 an hour by 2020. This will provide a much needed raise for Coloradans who have experienced an economic boom that has increased rents by thirty-seven percent over the past decade.

Maine:

In Maine, local activists and community leaders have placed a measure on the ballot to raise the minimum wage to $12 an hour by 2020. It has been met with strong opposition by Maine’s outspoken governor, Paul LePage, who has called for organizers of the initiative to be charged with attempted murder because “They are deliberately and knowingly hurting Mainers.”

Washington:
In Washington State, the home to the first $15 minimum wage, there is a ballot measure to increase the statewide minimum wage to $13.50 an hour. This bill will also include a measure to make sure that the minimum wage rises with the rate of inflation each year, with an estimated minimum wage of $14.23 in 2022.

South Dakota:
Unlike the other four states with […]

By |November 2nd, 2016|Resources|Comments Off on Minimum Wage on the Ballot in 2016

EPI Releases New Agenda to Fix Gender Pay Gap

It is no secret that there is a steep pay gap between women and men. Everyday, women earn less than men for similar work.

New work from the Economic Policy Institute shows that on average, women earn $.82 for each dollar that men make. This disparity varies based on different ethnic groups, with African-American and Hispanic women earn $.65 and $.58 for every dollar white men make.

To counter this, EPI has proposed an agenda that would help to eliminate the wage gap, which includes a higher minimum wage, an elimination of the tipped minimum wage and more. The agenda can be found here.

By |October 26th, 2016|Resources|Comments Off on EPI Releases New Agenda to Fix Gender Pay Gap

This Saturday: The Fight for $15 National Convention in Richmond

 

More info available here

By |August 10th, 2016|Resources|Comments Off on This Saturday: The Fight for $15 National Convention in Richmond

UC Berkeley: Low Wages Cost U.S. Taxpayers $152.8 Billion Each Year in Public Support for Working Families

More available here

By |July 7th, 2016|Resources|Comments Off on UC Berkeley: Low Wages Cost U.S. Taxpayers $152.8 Billion Each Year in Public Support for Working Families

R. Pollin – A $15 U.S. MINIMUM WAGE: HOW THE FAST-FOOD INDUSTRY COULD ADJUST WITHOUT SHEDDING JOBS

“Rather, we find that the fast-food industry could fully absorb these wage bill increases through a combination of turnover reductions; trend increases in sales growth; and modest annual price increases over the four-year period.”

 

More available here.

By |March 29th, 2016|Resources|Comments Off on R. Pollin – A $15 U.S. MINIMUM WAGE: HOW THE FAST-FOOD INDUSTRY COULD ADJUST WITHOUT SHEDDING JOBS

UC Berkeley – Positive Benefits to a $15 Minimum Wage in New York State

From the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment:

“Our results indicate that a $15 statewide minimum wage would generate a 23.4 percent average wage increase for 3.16 million workers in the state. This improvement in living standards would greatly outweigh the small effect on employment. And the increase in wages would help reverse decades of wage declines for low-paid workers. How can such a major improvement in living standards occur without adverse employment effects? While a higher minimum wage induces some automation, as well as increased worker productivity and higher prices, it simultaneously increases worker purchasing power. In the end, the costs of the minimum wage will be borne by turnover reductions, productivity increases and modest price increases.”

 

Full report available here

By |March 16th, 2016|Resources|Comments Off on UC Berkeley – Positive Benefits to a $15 Minimum Wage in New York State